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Oil Spill Highlights Demand for New Engineers

According to Martin Grant, managing director of Atkins' Energy business, the energy industry has a growing demand for engineering experts to satisfy the increasing needs of the energy industry.  Grant claims this demand calls for up to 500,000 new engineers in the coming two decades.

The oil spill that ravaged the waters and surrounding lands of the Gulf of Mexico spotlights not only the need to engineer better offshore, deepwater well technology but also the need to engineer new technologies to capture under-tapped and under-utilized sources of energy.

The International Energy Authority (IEA) has suggested that upwards of 10.5 TRILLION will need to be spent by the year 2030 to fulfill the need for more environmentally sound power sources.  And this doesn't count the money being spent now and in the future to secure better ways of extracting oil and natural gas.

While "green" sources of energy, such as wind turbines, show promise, they are a long way from becoming a major source of energy. Large scale grid upgrades, and massive offshore wind-farms will require a more advanced technical work force and more engineers.
New solutions for our energy problems will require nimble, agile thinkers trained to use science, math and physics and also "think outside the box".

With governments beginning to legislate towards lowering carbon economies, engineers will be required to turn promise into reality. A greater number of college students will be encouraged to go into technical degree paths to meet the demands of the coming decades.

In ancient Egypt, the floods of the Nile held back civilization until engineers learned how to build dams and bring a predictable, normal routine to the people who needed the river to live.  Since this time, engineers have been at the forefront answering the needs of society.  Today we have new needs and to evolve to a safer era of new possibilities we need engineers more than ever.