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Using the Hudson River to Cool the New World Trade Center

A chiller plant is being built that will access water from the Hudson River to cool and dehumidify buildings that make up the new World Trade Center complex in New York.

The chiller plant will use upwards of 30,000 gallons per minute to cool the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, the Transportation Hub and its various passageways as well as shopping concourses and in the planned performing arts center.
In his New York Times article from April 6,2009, David Dunlap relates how the chiller plant was originally designed to cool all the buildings in the new World Trade Center complex but that environmental groups complained about the number of fish that would ultimately get sucked into the chiller.

Now the chiller plant will be limited in water intake and therefore in cooling capacity.  Still, 30,000 gallons per minute is a sizable amount of water and it will be used on a significant portion of the new complex.   The chiller plant uses 4 large piplines with pipes large enough for a man to crawl through.  Paul W. Johnke, senior grogram manager in the World Trade Center construction division of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey is quoted in the article as saying "We built it for a hundred years."

Hudson River water may range in temperature from 40 to 70 degrees and there will  be times in the Fall and Winter where no other mechanical cooling will be required for the targeted structures of the chilling plant.  The plans and construction for the new World Trade Center will be studied by engineers around the world especially because of the historical significance of the project as a whole.